Latest statistics on dementia prevalence in England

Annual report brings together GP-level data on recorded dementia diagnoses.

The latest statistics on dementia prevalence in England have been published by NHS Digital.  Recorded Dementia Diagnoses 2016/17 uses information provided by general practices in England about the number of dementia diagnoses in their individual practice.

For each general practice included in this data collection, NHS Digital receives a count of the number of patients with a dementia diagnosis in their clinical record, as well as a count of the total number of registered patients at the practice.

Key Facts:

In 2016-17:

  • 422,000 people aged 65 and over in England have a recorded dementia diagnosis. This represents 1 in 23 people aged 65+ registered with a GP.
  • 1 in 5 women aged 90 or over have a recorded dementia diagnosis, the highest prevalence for any group.
  • There were 207,797 unique patients aged 65 and over admitted to hospital in an emergency with a diagnosis of dementia (provisional data).
  • Dementia is more common in people with learning disabilities, particularly for individuals with Down syndrome who appear to develop dementia at younger ages

The report also covers topics such as:

  • Dementia related emergency hospital admissions (England)
  • Dementia prevalence for patients with learning disabilities
  • Recorded dementia diagnoses by ethniticy and age

Dementia numbers set to rise to 1.2 million by 2040 in England & Wales

Experts are predicting that there will be 1.2 million people in England and Wales living with dementia by 2040 – a rise of 57% from 2016 – due to increased life expectancy.

A study  published in The BMJ  says that although the number of newly diagnosed cases of dementia is falling, the overall prevalence will increase substantially as people live longer and deaths from other causes, such as heart disease, continue to decline.

The team of researchers  based at University College London (UCL) and the University of Liverpool, set out to predict the future burden of dementia with more certainty by developing a mathematical model that takes account of disease trends and death rates alongside the effects of increasing life expectancy.  They calculated that there were currently 767,000 people living with dementia in England and Wales and the number would increase to more than 1.2 million by 2040.

Full story at OnMedica

Full reference: Ahmadi-Abhari, S et al.  Temporal trend in dementia incidence since 2002 and projections for prevalence in England and Wales to 2040: modelling study BMJ Published 05 July 2017

 

 

Monthly announcement of national dementia diagnosis rate

Alistair Burns, NHS England’s clinical director for dementia has written to CCGs with an update on national priorities and the latest dementia diagnosis figures, for April 2017 | NHS England

The monthly CCG letters can be found below with the national dementia diagnosis rates alongside general updates on national priorities. Commissioners are asked to cascade this information to member practices.

Trends in diagnosis and treatment for people with dementia in the UK 2005-2015

Donegan, K. et al. The Lancet Public Health | Published online: 23 February 2017

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Image source: The Lancet Public Health

Image shows proportion of CPRD (Clinical Practice Research Datalink) population diagnosed with dementia in the UK by region between July, 2005, and June, 2015

Background: The objectives of this study were to describe changes in the proportion of people diagnosed with dementia and the pharmacological treatments prescribed to them over a 10 year period from 2005 to 2015 at a time of UK policy strategies and prioritisation of dementia. We aimed to explore the potential impact of policy on dementia care.

Interpretation: Over the 10 years studied, there is evidence of a sustained positive change in diagnosis rates of dementia and in the quality of drug treatment provided to those diagnosed. The prescription of antidementia drugs more than doubled and the prescription of potentially hazardous antipsychotics halved after the introduction of national dementia strategies. These data support the formulation and delivery of national policy to improve the quality of care for people with dementia.

Read the full article here

National dementia diagnosis rates and monthly workbook published

The National Clinical Director for Dementia, Professor Alistair Burns has been writing to CCGs with the national dementia diagnosis rate in order to achieve and maintain the national ambition of diagnosing 2/3rd of the estimated population living with dementia.

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The monthly CCG letters can be found below with the national dementia diagnosis rates alongside general updates on national priorities. Commissioners are asked to cascade this information to member practices.

CCG Letter – Dementia Diagnosis Rates – November 2016
CCG Letter – Dementia Diagnosis Rates – October 2016

Read the full overview here

Dementia on the downslide, especially among people with more education

In a hopeful sign for the health of the nation’s brains, the percentage of American seniors with dementia is dropping, a new study finds | ScienceDaily

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The downward trend has emerged despite something else the study shows: a rising tide of three factors that are thought to raise dementia risk by interfering with brain blood flow, namely diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity.

Those with the most years of education had the lowest chances of developing dementia, according to the findings published in JAMA Internal Medicine by a team from the University of Michigan. This may help explain the larger trend, because today’s seniors are more likely to have at least a high school diploma than those in the same age range a decade ago.

With the largest generation in American history now entering the prime years for dementia onset, the new results add to a growing number of recent studies in the United States and other countries that suggest a downward trend in dementia prevalence. These findings may help policy-makers and economic forecasters adjust their predictions for the total impact of Alzheimer’s disease and other conditions.

Read the full review here

Read the original research article here

Prevalence of dementia subtypes in U.S. Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries, 2011–2013

Goodman, R.A. et al.Alzheimer’s & Dementia. Published online: 10 May 2016

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Image source: Stephen Magrath – Wellcome Images // CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Highlights

  • Rapid growth of the older adult population requires greater epidemiologic characterization of dementia.
  • We developed national prevalence estimates of diagnosed dementia and subtypes in the highest risk U.S. population by analyzing Centers for Medicare & Medicaid administrative enrollment and claims data for 100% of Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries enrolled during 2011–2013 and age ≥68 years as of December 31, 2013 (n = 21.6 million).
  • Over 3.1 million (14.4%) beneficiaries had a claim for a service and/or treatment for any dementia subtype.
  • Dementia not otherwise specified was the most common diagnosis (present in 92.9%); the most common subtype was Alzheimer’s (43.5%), followed by vascular (14.5%), Lewy body (5.4%), frontotemporal (1.0%), and alcohol induced (0.7%).
  • This study, the first to document concurrent prevalence of primary dementia subtypes among this U.S. population, provides findings that can assist in prioritizing dementia research, clinical services, and caregiving resources.

Read the abstract here

Dementia profile

This new profiling tool aims to help enable a major change in the way dementia data will be used at a local level. It will allow users to create a bespoke comparison between local authorities and CCGs in England and shares key information such as the number of people who have dementia, broken down by area and age; the number of people who have received an NHS health check; the number of people who have depression; emergency hospital admission numbers; and where people with dementia die.

Global Impact of Dementia: World Alzheimer Report 2015

The World Alzheimer Report 2015: ‘The Global Impact of Dementia: An analysis of prevalence, incidence, cost and trends’, released this month, has found that there are currently around 46.8 million people living with dementia around the world, with numbers projected to nearly double every 20 years, increasing to 74.7 million by 2030 and 131.5 million by 2050. There are over 9.9 million new cases of dementia each year worldwide, implying one new case every 3.2 seconds.

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The report shows that the current annual societal and economic cost of dementia is US $818 billion, and it is expected to become a trillion dollar disease in just three years’ time. The findings show that the cost of dementia has increased by 35% since the 2010 World Alzheimer Report.