Dementia profile: April 2020 data update

Updated statistics on dementia prevalence, care and mortality, at the national and subnational geographical areas in England | Public Health England

In total 41 indicators have been updated in the dementia profile. Data  being used covers the financial year 2018 to 2019 or calendar year 2018, unless stated otherwise.

This release includes one new indicator added to the living well domain called ‘Dementia: Prescriptions of anti-psychotic medication in the last 6 weeks for patients with dementia and no diagnosis of psychosis’.

To accompany the refresh of the dementia profile there is a statistical commentary, which highlights key findings.

These findings include:

  • prevalence of dementia in the under 65 age group has reduced significantly from 3.4 per 10,000 in 2018 to 3.2 per 10,000 in 2019 although there has been no significant change in all age prevalence
  • the Care Quality Commission (CQC) quality ratings for residential care and nursing home beds rated as good or better has also increased significantly from 68.6% in 2018 to 73.0% in 2019
  • short stay emergency admissions as a proportion of all emergency admissions of people with dementia aged 65 years and over has continued to rise. This proportion has increased significantly from 30.9% in financial year ending 2018 to 32.4% in financial year ending 2019
  • the proportion of people with dementia dying at home has continued to increase with a significant rise from 9.9% in 2017 to 10.4% in 2018
  • the proportion of people with dementia dying in hospital has continued to decrease with a significant reduction from 30.4% in 2017 to 29.8% in 2018

Full detail: Dementia profile: April 2020 data update

Research shows dementia rates falling by 15% per decade over last 30 years

The risk of developing dementia is falling, thanks to lifestyle improvements such as reductions in smoking, new research has found. Researchers have said that while the overall number of cases is rising due to the population living longer, an individual’s chances of having the disease is going down | Alzheimers Research UK

International experts have presented research indicating that dementia incidence rates may be falling by up to 15% decade on decade. Analysing data from seven population-based studies in the United States and Europe, Prof Hofman and a global team of researchers set out to determine changes in the incidence of dementia between 1988 and 2015.

Of 59,230 individuals included in the research, 5,133 developed dementia. The rate of new dementia cases declined by 15% per decade, a finding that was consistent across the different studies included in the analysis.

The findings will be discussed at the Alzheimer’s Research UK Conference 2019 in Harrogate.

Full story at Alzheimer’s Research UK

See also:

In This video, lead author Albert Hofman, discusses trends in dementia incidence over the last three decades at the Alzheimer’s Research UK  Conference 2019. Prof. Hofman goes on to explain the reasoning behind these trends.

 

Recorded Dementia Diagnoses

Recorded Dementia Diagnoses – July 2018 | NHS Digital

NHS Digital collects and publishes data about people with dementia at each GP practice, so that the NHS (GPs and commissioners) can make informed choices about how to plan their services around their patients needs.

This publication includes the rate of dementia diagnosis. As not everyone with dementia has a formal diagnosis, this statistic compares the number of people thought to have dementia with the number of people diagnosed with dementia, aged 65 and over.

Full detail at NHS Digital

 

Data reveals 7.4% rise in number of deaths caused by dementia

Figures released by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) show there has been a 7.4% increase in deaths from all forms of dementia – with a 5.3% increase in deaths from vascular and unspecified dementia, and a 13.9% increase in deaths from Alzheimer‘s disease

The Office for National Statistics latest figures reveal there were 533,253 deaths registered in England and Wales in 2017, a 1.6% increase from 2016. Data for 2017 shows that in total, there were 67,641 deaths attributed to Alzheimer’s disease or other forms of dementia – 13% of the total deaths recorded that year. This is a rise from 2016, when there were 62,948 deaths from dementia (12% of all those recorded).

Alzheimer’s Research UK is calling for urgent investment in dementia research, following the release of these new statistics. Dr Matthew Norton, Director of Policy and Strategy at Alzheimer’s Research UK, said:

“These figures yet again underline the overwhelming impact of dementia for the UK, and for hundreds of thousands of families who are hit by the condition. With one in four hospital beds occupied by someone with dementia and deaths from the condition rising, we must take urgent action. As well as support for dementia research, the condition must become a priority for the NHS 10-year plan”.

Full statistical release: Deaths registered in England and Wales: 2017 | ONS

See also: New data shows rise in deaths caused by dementia | Alzheimer’s Society

Recorded Dementia Diagnoses March 2018

Number of people diagnosed with Dementia according to GP records up to the 31 March 2018

This publication presents at England level: recorded prevalence and how this compares with research based studies at different ages, and how prevalence differs at different ages depending on comorbidity; CCG level: the rate of emergency hospital admissions for dementia per person recorded with a dementia diagnosis.

Key Facts:

  • Recorded dementia prevalence at 31 March 2018 was 0.765 per cent (1 person in 131). When considered alongside monthly data previously collected, this indicates a decrease in recorded prevalence from March 2017 (0.766) to March 2018 (0.765).
  • The number of people over 65 with dementia was estimated to be 645,507. Of these, 67.5 per cent have a coded dementia diagnosis recorded.
  • 9.3 per cent of patients with a recorded dementia diagnosis were prescribed antipsychotic medication in the 6 weeks to 31 March 2018.

Full document available via NHS Digital

Dementia prevention, intervention, and care

Livingston, G. et al. | Dementia prevention, intervention, and care | The Lancet , Volume 390 , Issue 10113 , 2673 – 2734

This article argues that there is a potential for better disease prevention and for care to offer more improvements to the lives of a growing number of people with dementia.

To reduce dementia incidence, article authors recommend active treatment of hypertension for all people over 45 without dementia. Furthermore, they estimate that interventions into such risk factors as childhood education, exercise, maintaining social engagement, reducing smoking, and management of hearing loss, depression, diabetes, and obesity might have the potential to delay or prevent a third of dementia cases.

Full paper available via The Lancet

 

Dementia is still the leading cause of death in England and Wales

Dementia and Alzheimer’s disease remain the leading cause of death in England and Wales, accounting for 12.0% of all deaths registered in 2016, up from 11.6% in 2015, according to new Office of National Statistics (ONS) figures.

This increase is attributed by ONS to people living longer, due to improved lifestyles and medical advances. With people living longer and surviving other illnesses, the number of people developing dementia and Alzheimer disease is increasing.  Improved identification and diagnosis of dementia has also contributed to the increase.

Here, the Alzheimer’s Society responds to the figures showing dementia remains the leading cause of death.

Latest statistics on dementia prevalence in England

Annual report brings together GP-level data on recorded dementia diagnoses.

The latest statistics on dementia prevalence in England have been published by NHS Digital.  Recorded Dementia Diagnoses 2016/17 uses information provided by general practices in England about the number of dementia diagnoses in their individual practice.

For each general practice included in this data collection, NHS Digital receives a count of the number of patients with a dementia diagnosis in their clinical record, as well as a count of the total number of registered patients at the practice.

Key Facts:

In 2016-17:

  • 422,000 people aged 65 and over in England have a recorded dementia diagnosis. This represents 1 in 23 people aged 65+ registered with a GP.
  • 1 in 5 women aged 90 or over have a recorded dementia diagnosis, the highest prevalence for any group.
  • There were 207,797 unique patients aged 65 and over admitted to hospital in an emergency with a diagnosis of dementia (provisional data).
  • Dementia is more common in people with learning disabilities, particularly for individuals with Down syndrome who appear to develop dementia at younger ages

The report also covers topics such as:

  • Dementia related emergency hospital admissions (England)
  • Dementia prevalence for patients with learning disabilities
  • Recorded dementia diagnoses by ethniticy and age

Dementia numbers set to rise to 1.2 million by 2040 in England & Wales

Experts are predicting that there will be 1.2 million people in England and Wales living with dementia by 2040 – a rise of 57% from 2016 – due to increased life expectancy.

A study  published in The BMJ  says that although the number of newly diagnosed cases of dementia is falling, the overall prevalence will increase substantially as people live longer and deaths from other causes, such as heart disease, continue to decline.

The team of researchers  based at University College London (UCL) and the University of Liverpool, set out to predict the future burden of dementia with more certainty by developing a mathematical model that takes account of disease trends and death rates alongside the effects of increasing life expectancy.  They calculated that there were currently 767,000 people living with dementia in England and Wales and the number would increase to more than 1.2 million by 2040.

Full story at OnMedica

Full reference: Ahmadi-Abhari, S et al.  Temporal trend in dementia incidence since 2002 and projections for prevalence in England and Wales to 2040: modelling study BMJ Published 05 July 2017

 

 

Trends in diagnosis and treatment for people with dementia in the UK 2005-2015

Donegan, K. et al. The Lancet Public Health | Published online: 23 February 2017

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Image source: The Lancet Public Health

Image shows proportion of CPRD (Clinical Practice Research Datalink) population diagnosed with dementia in the UK by region between July, 2005, and June, 2015

Background: The objectives of this study were to describe changes in the proportion of people diagnosed with dementia and the pharmacological treatments prescribed to them over a 10 year period from 2005 to 2015 at a time of UK policy strategies and prioritisation of dementia. We aimed to explore the potential impact of policy on dementia care.

Interpretation: Over the 10 years studied, there is evidence of a sustained positive change in diagnosis rates of dementia and in the quality of drug treatment provided to those diagnosed. The prescription of antidementia drugs more than doubled and the prescription of potentially hazardous antipsychotics halved after the introduction of national dementia strategies. These data support the formulation and delivery of national policy to improve the quality of care for people with dementia.

Read the full article here