Dementia friendly patient identification wrist bands

A Senior Healthcare Assistant (HCA) and Dementia Champion within the Royal Preston Hospital Emergency Department developed an adapted patient identification wristband that supported staff to recognise that a patient may have additional needs related to their diagnosis of dementia | NHS England

A discreet adaptation was made to existing wrist bands to notify any member of staff that the patient has dementia and that they needed to utilise their dementia care training when supporting the patient.

forget-me-not-1144695_1920

This was achieved by cutting a forget-me-not flower symbol into the patient’s wristband between a patient’s information and the barcode ensuring visibility of the symbol. Further work was undertaken with staff across the emergency and other departments within the hospital to notify them of the changes to the wristband and what the innovation was aiming to achieve.

There has been positive feedback from patients’, their families, friends and carers, as well as health professionals and the general public. The impact of the improvements has been well received by patients, their families and carers as well as staff at the hospital. Qualitative feedback, has shown that they feel patients are treated with dignity and respect by the Emergency Department team.

Full story at NHS England

New report from Sheffield Dementia Involvement Group

Sheffield Dementia Involvement Group (SHINDIG)  provides a forum for people with dementia (and their family carers / supporters) in Sheffield to share their views and experiences of living with dementia and of health and social care services. The group has been running for five years, and meets four times a year.

The SHINDIG group have recently produced the following report giving advice for staff about gathering feedback on their experience of services from people living with dementia:

Advice to NHS and Social Care Staff on Gathering Feedback from People with Dementia and their Family Carers / Supporters

 

Age UK report: ‘Why call it care when nobody cares?’

Age UK |  2018 | Older people and their families tell politicians about the problems they face with care

A new report by Age UK – ‘Why call it care when nobody cares?’ – summarises the results of a series of listening events the charity  held with older people who are receiving care and their family carers earlier this year. 127 people participated in 13 sessions in total, which took place in the North, Midlands and South of England, in urban and rural places, and in more affluent and poorer areas.

Each of the listening events, were hosted by local Age UKs and had two parts:

  • in the first older people and their family carers talked about their personal experiences of care, highlighted the problems they faced and what would make life better;
  • and in the second they discussed various funding proposals and what they would mean for them and their families.

Age UK designed these events to help policymakers understand the real-life issues facing older people in need of care and their family carers in their constituencies, and to provide an opportunity to discuss potential solutions.  There was much commonality in the issues raised, and the same issues featured throughout the country,  showing that the problems facing adult social care are national.

The top five reasons mentioned the most in the sessions:

1. ‘Too many professional carers are in a rush and there’s no continuity

2. ‘Care often it isn’t very good’

3. ‘Social care is very expensive and often not good value for money’

4. ‘We family carers feel abandoned and unsupported by the NHS and social care’

5. ‘The social care system is dysfunctional and navigating it is a nightmare’

Older people suggested possible solutions to these issues:

1. ‘Everyone should contribute in some way’

2. ‘We’re only willing to pay more if we get a better service in return’

3. ‘We want any extra funds that are raised to be ring-fenced for care’

4. ‘We believe we need a new and better contract with family carers in our society’

5. ‘We older people and our families desperately want security’ (Age UK)

The full news piece can be read at Age UK 

You can read the full Age UK report here 

 

Are physiotherapists employing person-centred care for people with dementia?

Hall, A et al. | Are physiotherapists employing person-centred care for people with dementia? An exploratory qualitative study examining the experiences of people with dementia and their carers | BMC Geriatrics | 2018 18:63

Abstract
Background
People with dementia may receive physiotherapy for a variety of reasons. This may be for musculoskeletal conditions or as a result of falls, fractures or mobility difficulties. While previous studies have sought to determine the effectiveness of physiotherapy interventions for people with dementia, little research has focused on the experiences of people receiving such treatment. The aim of this study was to gain an in-depth understanding of people’s experiences of receiving physiotherapy and to explore these experiences in the context of principles of person-centred care.

Methods
Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with people with dementia or their carers between September 2016 and January 2017. A purposive sampling strategy recruited participants with dementia from the South West of England who had recently received physiotherapy. We also recruited carers to explore their involvement in the intervention. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data.

Results
A total of eleven participants were recruited to the study. Six people with dementia were interviewed and five interviews undertaken separately with carers of people with dementia. Three themes were identified. The first explores the factors that enable exercises to be undertaken successfully, the second deals with perceived resource pressures, and the final theme “the physiotherapy just vanished” explores the feeling of abandonment felt when goals and expectations of physiotherapy were not discussed. When mapped against the principles of person-centred care, our participants did not describe physiotherapy adopting such an approach.

Conclusion
Lack of a person-centred care approach was evident by ineffective communication, thus failing to develop a shared understanding of the role and aims of physiotherapy. The incorporation of person-centred care may help reduce the frustration and feelings of dissatisfaction that some of our participants reported.

Full reference available at BMC Geriatrics

“I’m Still Here”: Personhood and the Early-Onset Dementia Experience

The current study examined the lived experience from the point of view of four adults younger than 65 with dementia, particularly how they perceive their personhood | Journal of Gerontological Nursing

mechanical-2033446_960_720.jpg

Using interpretative phenomenological analysis as the research approach, findings revealed that the EOD experience can be incorporated into six themes: (a) A Personal Journey, (b) Navigating the System, (c) The Stigma of Dementia, (d) Connecting to the World, (e) A Story Worth Telling, and (f) I’m Still Here. Participants’ stories, as presented via these six thematic threads, reveal that individuals with EOD can have a strong sense of personhood. Findings are discussed and situated within the current EOD body of knowledge, and new knowledge is presented. Implications for practice and recommendations for future research are discussed.

Full reference: Sakamoto, M.L. et al. (2017) “I’m Still Here”: Personhood and the Early-Onset Dementia Experience. Journal of Gerontological Nursing. 43(5) pp. 12-17

The experience of people with dementia and nurses in hospital

Digby, R. et al. (2017) Journal of Clinical Nursing. 26(9-10) pp. 1152–1171

door-2133199_960_720.png

Aims and objectives: To identify and examine existing research exploring how people with dementia and nurses view acute hospital care.

Background: Admission to hospital can be traumatic for a person with dementia due to an inability to cope with unfamiliar environments, faces and routines. Adverse behavioural and health outcomes can result. Dementia adds complexity to patient care. Inability to deliver appropriate care is a source of stress and frustration for nurses.

Conclusions: Nurses require improved education and support to care for patients with dementia. Hospitals must focus on genuine caring concurrently with rapid discharge requirements, risk mitigation and fiscal restraint. More research is needed to inform the development of appropriate care for people with dementia in hospitals.

Relevance to clinical practice: Nurses must understand the complex needs of people with dementia in hospital. Nurse education about dementia, practical support, strong clinical leadership and role-modelling is needed. Empathy for patients regardless of diagnosis must remain a core attribute of nurses. Current hospital culture requires wider system review to mitigate against stigmatisation of patients with dementia.

Read the full abstract here

The experience of people with dementia and nurses in hospital

Digby, R. et al. (2017) Journal of Clinical Nursing. 26(9-10) pp. 1152–1171

doctor-840127_960_720.jpg

Aims and objectives: To identify and examine existing research exploring how people with dementia and nurses view acute hospital care.

Background: Admission to hospital can be traumatic for a person with dementia due to an inability to cope with unfamiliar environments, faces and routines. Adverse behavioural and health outcomes can result. Dementia adds complexity to patient care. Inability to deliver appropriate care is a source of stress and frustration for nurses.

Conclusions: Nurses require improved education and support to care for patients with dementia. Hospitals must focus on genuine caring concurrently with rapid discharge requirements, risk mitigation and fiscal restraint. More research is needed to inform the development of appropriate care for people with dementia in hospitals.

Relevance to clinical practice: Nurses must understand the complex needs of people with dementia in hospital. Nurse education about dementia, practical support, strong clinical leadership and role-modelling is needed. Empathy for patients regardless of diagnosis must remain a core attribute of nurses. Current hospital culture requires wider system review to mitigate against stigmatisation of patients with dementia.

Read the abstract here