NICE impact end of life care for adults

NICE| October 2020| NICE impact end of life care for adults

Many people are unable to access all the support they need at the end of their life.

NICE impact end of life care for adults, is a new report from NICE which highlights progress made by the health and care system in implementing NICE guidance on end of life care. This publication highlights how the quality of care can be variable depending on location, social and cultural background, and diagnosis.

Many people are unable to access support at the end of life. We need to understand and strengthen the impact of NICE guidance on people’s experience of end of life care

.Julie Pearce (chief nurse and executive director of caring services) and Dr Sarah Holmes (medical director, service transformation and innovation).

The report makes some of the following key points:

Care of people approaching the end of life

  • Care at the end of life should be identified in a timely way.  If identification is effective and timely, this can allow people, and those important to them, to make decisions about their care. 
  • NICE’s quality standard on end of life care for adults says that the opportunity to develop a personalised care plan should be part of a comprehensive holistic assessment for people approaching the end of life.
  •  90% of people did not have a care plan in place on arrival at their final hospital admission
  • People with conditions such as dementia, which are not always recognised as life-limiting, often face an additional barrier to dying in their preferred place. This is because certain care settings, for example hospices, are not always offered as an option for them.
  • Healthcare professionals did not always consider the communication needs of people with dementia and sometimes assumed that the person with dementia lacked capacity

NICE impact end of life care for adults [news release]

Summary of the report available from NICE

NICE impact end of life care for adults (PDF) [report]

NICEimpact dementia

NICE | February 2020 | NICEimpact dementia

Around 460,000 people in England are diagnosed with dementia. And it’s estimated that an additional 200,000 people are undiagnosed. The latest report from NICE  highlights progress made by the health and care system in implementing NICE guidance. We recognise that change can sometimes be challenging and may require pathway reconfiguration. Additional resources such as training and new equipment may also be required.

We work with partners including NHS England and NHS Improvement, Local Government Association, the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services, the Care Providers Alliance and Public Health England to support these changes, and we also look for opportunities to make savings by reducing ineffective practice (Source: NICE).

Read it online 

 

Supporting adult carers

Supporting adult carers | NICE guideline [NG150] | Published January 2020

This guideline covers support for adults (aged 18 and over) who provide unpaid care for anyone aged 16 or over with health or social care needs. It aims to improve the lives of carers by helping health and social care practitioners identify people who are caring for someone and give them the right information and support. It covers carers’ assessments, practical, emotional and social support and training, and support for carers providing end of life care.

This guideline covers general principles that apply to all adult carers. Recommendations about supporting carers of people with specific health needs can be found in NICE guidance on those conditions.

This guideline includes recommendations on:

See also:  NICE interactive flowchart – Supporting adult carers

[NICE Guideline] Delirium: prevention, diagnosis and management Clinical guideline [CG103]

NICE | March 2019 | Delirium: prevention, diagnosis and management Clinical guideline [CG103]

NICE has updated this clinical guideline, the guideline covers diagnosing and treating delirium in people aged 18 and over in hospital and in long-term residential care or a nursing home. It also covers identifying people at risk of developing delirium in these settings and preventing onset. It aims to improve diagnosis of delirium and reduce hospital stays and complications.

In March 2019 NICE removed the use of olanzapine for the treatment of delirium in people who are distressed or considered a risk to themselves or others.

Full details from NICE 

Summary of key recommendations from NICE guidance

The latest edition of the NICE Bites newsletter provides a useful summary of the latest NICE guideline on the subject of dementia, which was released in June 2018.

NICE Bites is a monthly prescribing bulletin published by North West Medicines Information centre which summarises key recommendations from NICE guidance. NICE Bites No 111 October 2018 includes one topic: Dementia; assessment, management and support for people living with dementia and their carers. Sections covered include: diagnosis, review after diagnosis, involving people in decision-making, providing information, pharmacological treatment, managing non-cognitive symptoms, assessing and managing co-morbidities, risks during hospital admission, palliative care.

Full reference: Dementia; Assessment, Management and Support for People Living With Dementia and Their Carers (NICE Bites)

Full guideline: Dementia: assessment, management and support for people living with dementia and their carers – guidance (NG97)  | National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) | June 2018.

Dementia (update): Topic engagement [NICE]

NICE | September 2018 | Dementia (update)

NICE want to hear about the 5 key areas for quality improvement which you consider as having the greatest potential to improve the quality of care in this area. Tell NICE about the 5 key areas for quality improvement which you consider as having the greatest potential to improve the quality of care in this area (NICE).

See NICE for details

NICE guidelines recommend telling people about dementia research opportunities

NIHR | June 2018 | New NICE guidelines recommend telling people about dementia research opportunities

NICE recently advised that every patient diagnosed with dementia should be provided with information of research opportunities they could potentially participate in.

 

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NIHR  New NICE guidelines recommend telling people about dementia research opportunities

 

 

Updated NICE guidance

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) have updated their guidance on the management and support of dementia.  This is the first time the guideline has been updated in 10 years, and acts as a reference for best practice for all those working in the health and social care field, including GPs, and social workers.

A NICE spokesman said the key changes are the recommendations around training staff correctly and those to help carers to better support people living with dementia.

It also recommends providing people living with dementia with a single named health or social care professional who is responsible for coordinating their care.

The updated guidance also recommends that the initial assessment includes taking a history (including cognitive, behavioural and psychological symptoms, and the impact symptoms have on their daily life) from the person with suspected dementia, and if possible, from someone who knows the person well.

Full guideline: Dementia: assessment, management and support for people living with dementia and their carers (NG97)

See also: New NICE guidelines recommend telling people about dementia research opportunities

 

NICE takes key role in new European project for faster access to Alzheimer’s disease drugs

Patients’ priorities will be brought to the fore in new Alzheimer’s project | NICE

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NICE is taking part in a European project to speed up the development of new drugs to treat Alzheimer’s disease.

The ROADMAP initiative aims to establish a sustainable platform for real world evidence generation on Alzheimer’s disease.

The new project provides a unique and game-changing opportunity to gather evidence from other sources, such as electronic health records, and discover what outcomes are important to patients and carers.

Alzheimer’s disease, and the different ways it presents and progresses in different people, poses a difficulty for traditional clinical trials which do not always provide answers decision makers such as NICE would be looking for when assessing new drugs to treat the disease.

Read the full news story here