Stirling researchers explore how assistive tech can help people with dementia

University of Stirling | February 2021 | Uni researchers explore how assistive tech can help people with dementia

A new research project will explore how assistive technology, such as telecare devices, can better support residents in retirement living schemes and those living with long-term conditions such as dementia.

The project INVITE (promoting inclusive living via technology-enabled support) is being funded by Longleigh Foundation and will investigate the success of assistive and everyday technologies in retirement living schemes and what further technologies might be required in the future.

This piece of research will combine the expertise of three acadmeics from the University of Stirling: Dr Jane Robertson, Dr Vikki McCall and Dr Grant Gibson from the Faculty of Social Sciences. Other stakeholders involved include the social housing provider Stonewater, as well as other experts from Stirlings Dr Steve Rolfe, a Research Fellow with expertise in housing, and Angela Pusram, a Research Assistant with expertise in dementia, will work with Stonewater’s retirement communities and their families in three localities of England – Eastbourne, Hereford and Nottingham (Source: University of Stirling).

Full details are available from the University of Stirling

Useful tips on the COVID-19 vaccine for people with dementia #covid19rftlks

Dementia Partnerships | January 2021 | Useful tips on the COVID-19 vaccine for people with dementia

The Royal College of Psychiatrists in conjunction with Dementia UK, have produced a briefing that includes useful tips for giving the COVID-19 vaccine without causing distress and how to explain the vaccination to someone who is living with dementia.

Image source: rcpsych.ac.uk

The breifing includes useful tips for giving someone the vaccination without causing undue distress; how to explain to someone with dementia and/or their families about the COVID 19 vaccination and what happens if someone with dementia is unable to consent to their vaccine via Dementia Partnerships.

Read the full article at Dementia Partnerships

Access and download the Useful tips on the Covid-19 vaccine for people with dementia

Helen Green, Dementia Specialist Nurse on Dementia UK’s Admiral Nurse Dementia Helpline, charts the causes and progression of vascular dementia

Open Access Government | Feburary 15 2021 | Helen Green, Dementia Specialist Nurse on Dementia UK’s Admiral Nurse Dementia Helpline, charts the causes and progression of vascular dementia

This article charts the causes and progression of vascular dementia, it’s author Helen Green, Dementia Specialist Nurse on Dementia UK’s Admiral Nurse Dementia Helpline, explains more about the umbrella term dementia, vascular dementia and mixed dementia.

Causes and progression of vascular dementia

LGBT: Living with dementia

Alzheimer’s Society | nd | LGBT: Living with dementia

The Alzheimer’s Society has developed a webpage for individuals that are lesbian, gay, bisexual or trans and have dementia. On this page the UK’s leading dementia charity explains how LGBT people can live well with dementia.

This webpage focuses on the following:

  1. LGBT: Living with dementia
  2. LGBT: Memory problems and reminiscence
  3. LGBT: Your support
  4. LGBT: Your rights
  5. LGBT: Planning ahead
  6. LGBT: Services and support
  7. LGBT: Care settings
  8. LGBT – other resources

See Alzheimer’s Society for further details

BMJ Psychiatry: Relationship between afternoon napping and cognitive function in the ageing Chinese population

Cai, H., et al 2021| Relationship between afternoon napping and cognitive function in the ageing Chinese population|General Psychiatry|34|e100361| doi: 10.1136/gpsych-2020-100361

Research that looked at the potential relationship between having a nap in the afternoon and cognitive function in older people, reports an association between resting after lunch and improved cognitive function. Chinese researchers identified an association between demography, napping, napping frequency, physical diseases, and cognition in their sample of more than 2200 Chinese participants aged 60 or over at the study’s outset.

The authors add that n addition to reducing sleepiness, mid-day naps offer a variety of benefits such as memory consolidation, preparation for subsequent learning, executive functioning enhancement and a boost to emotional stability, but these effects were not observed in all cases.

Abstract

Background Several studies have shown that afternoon napping promotes cognitive function in the elderly; on the other hand, some studies have shown opposite results. This current study further examined the relationship between afternoon napping and cognitive function in the ageing Chinese population.

Methods A total of 2214 elderly were included (napping group: n=1534; non-napping group: n= equal to 680). They all received cognitive evaluations by the Beijing version of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment, the Mini-Mental State Examination, and the Chinese version of the Neuropsychological Test Battery. Among all the subjects, 739 elderly volunteered to take blood lipid tests.

Results Significant differences in cognitive function and blood lipids were observed between the napping and the non-napping groups. Afternoon napping was associated with better cognitive function including orientation, language, and memory in the present study. Subjects with the habit of afternoon napping also showed a higher level of triglyceride than the non-napping subjects.

Conclusion The results demonstrated that afternoon napping was related to better cognitive function in the Chinese ageing population.

Full paper from BMJ Psychiatry

In the news:

Science Daily Afternoon napping linked to better mental agility