Delirium Awareness Video

Delirium awareness video via CreativeConnection

Delirium in older adults often goes unrecognised by health care professionals and can be poorly managed. This video was produced with the aim of improving recognition and management of delirium in any healthcare setting.

The producers encourage this tool to be used as a resource for information or training about delirium, whether you are a health care professional, a family member or a caregiver for someone at risk of delirium.

Psychological Dimensions of Dementia: Putting the Person at the Centre of Care

The following report, put together by the British Psychological Society Dementia Advisory Group, presents a psychological perspective on the nature and experience of dementia

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Image source: BPS 

As well as outlining the roles and contributions of psychologists in the field of dementia care (particularly in supporting a move towards addressing dementia not only in terms of the underlying disease but also in considering the practical dimensions of social and cognitive disability associated with it), this report presents recommendations for action in the following areas:

  • Prevention
  • Assessment
  • Planning of care
  • Treatment and support
  • Dealing efectively and appropriately with families and carers
  • Training and research

These recommendations were produced in consultation with people experiencing dementia, their families, and their carers, in order to present a truly person-centred approach to dementia treatment and management in the UK.

Read the overview here

Read the full report here

Probiotics For the Alleviation of Symptoms in Advanced Alzheimer’s Disease?

Dementia and Elderly Care News. Published online: 14 November 2016

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Via Dementia and Elderly Care News

Iranian researchers appear to have discovered minor improvements in the symptoms of elderly people with severe Alzheimer’s Disease, associated with the regular consumption of probiotic drinks. The effects of probiotics on biomarkers for inflammation and metabolism were also investigated. More research is required before drawing firm conclusions.

Read the NHS Choices overview here

Read the original research article here

How well are the diagnosis and symptoms of dementia recorded in older patients admitted to hospital?

Crowther, G.J.E. et al. Age & Ageing. Published online: September 10 2016

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Image source: Stephen Magrath – Wellcome Images // CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Introduction: in the United Kingdom dementia is generally diagnosed by mental health services. General hospitals are managed by separate healthcare trusts and the handover of clinical information between organisations is potentially unreliable. Around 40% of older people admitted to hospital have dementia. This group have a high prevalence of psychological symptoms and delirium. If the dementia diagnosis or symptoms are not recognised, patients may suffer unnecessarily with resulting negative outcomes.

Discussion: this work suggests an under reporting of dementia and symptoms associated with it in the general hospital. Improving this requires closer collaboration between metal health and hospital healthcare services and training for staff on how to access diagnostic information and recognise common psychological symptoms.

Read the full article here

Family caregivers’ conceptualisation of quality end-of-life care for people with dementia

Davies, N. et al. Palliative Medicine. Published online: October 25, 2016

Background: People with dementia have been described as the ‘disadvantaged dying’ with poor end-of-life care. Towards the end of life, people with dementia cannot report on the care they receive. It is therefore important to talk to caregivers; however, few have explored the views about end-of-life care from the caregivers’ perspective. The majority of research on family caregivers has focussed on the burden and psychological impact of caring for a relative with dementia.

Aim: This study aimed to explore the views of family caregivers about quality end-of-life care for people with dementia.

Design: Qualitative study using in-depth interviews and analysed using thematic analysis.

Setting/participants: Purposive sampling from a third sector organisation’s caregiver network was used to recruit 47 caregivers in England (2012–2013), consisting of (1) family caregivers of someone who had recently received a diagnosis of dementia, (2) family caregivers currently caring for someone with dementia and (3) bereaved family caregivers.

Results: Three over-arching themes were derived from the interviewees’ discourse, including maintaining the person within, fostering respect and dignity and showing compassion and kindness.

Conclusion: End-of-life care for people with dementia does not differ from care throughout the dementia trajectory. Throughout the findings, there is an implicit underlying theme of conflict: conflict between family caregivers and an increasingly systematised service of care and conflict between family caregivers and professionals. This study has in particular demonstrated the importance of the psycho-social aspects of care, aligning with the holistic definition of palliative care.

Read the full article here

Local Authorities urged to make personal budgets dementia friendly

Deep-seated misconception of personal budgets and dementia is preventing local authorities from delivering person-centred care | Alzheimer’s Society

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Image source: Alzheimer’s Society

Alzheimer’s Society is calling on all local authorities in England to urgently break down the barriers preventing people with dementia accessing personal budgets.

Fewer than a third of people receiving social care support for problems with memory and cognition have a personal budget, despite the government’s aspirations for a person-centred care and support system. The Care Act gives everyone who is receiving support from social services the legal right to a personal budget, offering them greater choice and control over their care and support.

An Alzheimer’s Society audit of local authorities’ personal budgets processes has highlighted how the majority are falling at the first hurdle, with many failing to make people with dementia aware of their entitlement to a personal budget.

Read the full overview here

Read the guide here