Caring for People with Dementia: a clinical practice guideline for the radiography workforce

Caring for People with Dementia: a clinical practice guideline for the radiography
workforce (imaging and radiotherapy) | The Society and College of Radiographers

Caring for people with Dementia: a clinical practice guideline for the radiography workforce (imaging and radiotherapy) is a comprehensive and evidence-based document. It has a set of recommendations for the whole radiographic workforce caring for people with dementia and carers when undergoing imaging and/or radiotherapy. It has been developed systematically using the best available evidence from research and expert opinion, including service users, and subjected to peer professional, lay and external review.

scor
Image source: http://www.sor.org

The guideline has recommendations for good practice for individual members of the radiographic workforce, service managers, academic institutions and the Society and College of Radiographers (SCoR).

As a whole, this guideline acts to highlight to practitioners that to offer the best service and healthcare outcomes for people with dementia and carers, care must be tailored to the needs of the invidual.

There have been minor changes to the language used in this second edition, which emphasises the ability of and need for people with dementia to continue to live well with a good quality of meaningful life.

Full document: Caring for People with Dementia: a clinical practice guideline for the radiography workforce

What hinders and facilitates the implementation of nurse-led interventions in dementia care?

Karrer, M., Hirt, J., Zeller, A. et al. | What hinders and facilitates the implementation of nurse-led interventions in dementia care? A scoping review. | BMC Geriatrics | 20, 127 (2020)

Abstract

Background

The implementation of evidence-based interventions for people with dementia is complex and challenging. However, successful implementation might be a key element to ensure evidence-based practice and high quality of care. There is a need to improve implementation processes in dementia care by better understanding the arising challenges. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify recent knowledge concerning barriers and facilitators to implementing nurse-led interventions in dementia care.

Methods

We performed a scoping review using the methodological framework of Arksey and O’Malley. Studies explicitly reporting on the implementation process and factors influencing the implementation of a nurse-led intervention in dementia care in all settings were included. We searched eight databases from January 2015 until January 2019. Two authors independently selected the studies. For data analysis, we used an inductive approach to build domains and categories.

Results

We included 26 studies in the review and identified barriers as well as facilitators in five domains: policy (e.g. financing issues, health insurance), organisation (e.g. organisational culture and vision, resources, management support), intervention/implementation (e.g. complexity of the intervention, perceived value of the intervention), staff (e.g. knowledge, experience and skills, attitude towards the intervention), and person with dementia/family (e.g. nature and stage of dementia, response of persons with dementia and their families).

Conclusions

Besides general influencing factors for implementing nursing interventions, we identified dementia-specific factors reaching beyond already known barriers and facilitators. A pre-existing person-centred culture of care as well as consistent team cultures and attitudes have a facilitating effect on implementation processes. Furthermore, there is a need for interventions that are highly flexible and sensitive to patients’ condition, needs and behaviour.

Full article: What hinders and facilitates the implementation of nurse-led interventions in dementia care? A scoping review.

COVID-19: End of life care and dementia

This brief guidance was developed by Alistair Burns, National Clinical Director for Dementia at NHS England/Improvement, and has been incorporated into NHS England publications | via British Geriatrics Society

The majority of people with dementia (which is the leading cause of death in England and Wales) are aged over 70, have other long-term conditions and are frail, putting them into particularly vulnerable groups for developing complications if they are infected with COVID-19.

There are an estimated 675,000 people with dementia in England who are supported by a similar number of carers, most of whom are older people themselves. A quarter of people in acute hospitals and three quarters of residents of care homes have dementia.

This brief guidance may be useful to clinicians and planners when considering end of life care matters in people with dementia.

COVID-19: End of life care and dementia: Good practice guide.

Updated Coronavirus information for families looking after someone with dementia

Dementia UK are constantly updating the coronavirus hub on their website. Visit it to read the latest advice from dementia specialist Admiral Nurses, including the list of frequently asked questions coming through to the Dementia UK Helpline.

Coronavirus: advice for families looking after someone with dementia
The current government advice is for everyone over age 70 or with other health conditions to stay at home for up to 16 weeks. This does not specifically include people with dementia; but if the person you care for has other health considerations, or is in any way vulnerable, you might decide to follow this advice.  Full detail here

Coronavirus: questions and answers
Dementia UK have put together a list of commonly asked questions totheir Helpline, which will be updated as and when the situation develops. Full detail here

Leaflets and information
Information, blogs and ideas for people living with dementia during this time. Full detail here

Are large simple trials for dementia prevention possible?

William N Whiteley et al. | Are large simple trials for dementia prevention possible? | Age and Ageing | published 12th December 2019

  • Large simple trials have transformed care for heart attack and stroke. Lessons from these trials may be applicable to dementia prevention.
  • The size of the population and duration of follow-up needed for dementia prevention trials will be a major challenge. The reliable identification of higher risk populations is difficult but will be important.
  • Patients and families prioritise loss of function. Loss of functional abilities or clinical dementia are infrequent, but might be measured with lower variability than cognitive scores.

Abstract

New trials of dementia prevention are needed to test novel strategies and agents. Large, simple, cardiovascular trials have successfully discovered treatments with moderate but worthwhile effects to prevent heart attack and stroke. The design of these trials may hold lessons for the dementia prevention.Here we outline suitable populations, interventions and outcomes for large simple trials in dementia prevention. We consider what features are needed to maximise efficiency. Populations could be selected by age, clinical or genetic risk factors or clinical presentation. Patients and their families prioritise functional and clinical outcomes over cognitive scores and levels of biomarkers. Loss of particular functions or dementia diagnoses therefore are most meaningful to participants and potential patients and can be measured in large trials.

The size of the population and duration of follow-up needed for dementia prevention trials will be a major challenge and will need collaboration between many clinical investigators, funders and patient organisations.

Full article: Are large simple trials for dementia prevention possible?

A good CHAT boosts quality and saves money in dementia care

A nurse-led service aimed at providing more care for care home residents with dementia outside hospital has produced big savings and improved patient care – winning national endorsement from NHS England | Primary Care Commissioning

As well as providing expert care to the residents, the Enfield Care Home Assessment Team (CHAT)  supports and trains care home staff – giving them the confidence to respond to the residents’ needs and easier access to healthcare services when needed.

Having started as a pilot in four care homes in 2011, CHAT now supports 41 homes across Enfield and the neighbouring London borough of Haringey.  Its membership  draws together mental and physical health expertise – including community matrons, geriatricians, a consultant psychiatrist, mental health nurses, occupational therapists, a phlebotomist and pharmacists. The sense of integrated care is underlined by close partnerships with primary care, frailty networks and a tissue viability service.

Full story at Primary Care Commissioning

A less healthy lifestyle increases the risk of dementia

The less healthy your lifestyle, the more you are at risk of developing dementia in later life, a new systematic review has shown. Researchers analysed the results of 18 studies with over 44,000 participants | BMJ Open | via National Institute for Health research

nature-2292992_1920

Having two or more ‘modifiable risk factors’, including smoking, high blood pressure, poor diet, inactivity, obesity and excessive alcohol consumption, puts adults at greater risk of developing dementia.

The included studies followed up people without signs of cognitive decline to see who developed dementia of any cause.

A third of the studies could be combined in a meta analysis and these showed a 20% increase in the risk of dementia for one risk factor, which rose to 65% for two risk factors. The presence of three risk factors doubled the risk of dementia.

There was also a reduction in risk conveyed by having fewer risk factors and this, despite any direct evidence from intervention trials, holds out hope that interventions which either reduce or remove risk will lead to a reduction in the incidence of dementia diagnoses.

These results are consistent with our growing knowledge of the links between unhealthy lifestyles and dementia and are highly relevant to the promotion of healthy ageing behaviours in mid-life and beyond,  providing a compelling call to action in terms of public health and ageing.

Further detail at National Institute for Health Research

Full reference: Peters R, Booth A, Rockwood K et al. Combining modifiable risk factors and risk of dementia: a systematic review and meta-analysis. | BMJ Open | 2019 | 9:e022846.

Dementia care costs to nearly treble in next two decades

This report, commissioned by Alzheimer’s Society, provides projections of the number of older people (aged 65 and over) living with dementia and the costs of health care, social care and unpaid care for older people living with dementia from 2019 to 2040 in the UK | story via London School of Economics and Political Science 

The cost of social care for people living with dementia will nearly treble by 2040, according to a new report by the Care Policy and Evaluation Centre (CPEC).

The research shows that by 2040, while the number of people living with dementia in the UK is expected to nearly double (to 1.6 million), the cost of social care is expected to almost triple, increasing from £15.7 to £45.4 billion. It falls to people living with dementia and their families to pay the majority of these costs.

cpec
Image source: http://www.lse.ac.uk/

 

The study also estimates that families are providing £13.9 billion a year in unpaid care for people living with dementia. This is also projected to increase to £35.7 billion by 2040.

The total cost of dementia to the UK economy has risen to £34.7 billion and will continue to rise to £94.1 billion by 2040. This includes costs to the NHS, paid social care and unpaid care.

 
Full research paper: Projections of Older People Living with Dementia and Costs of Dementia Care in the United Kingdom, 2019–2040 | CPEC Working Paper 5 | Raphael Wittenberg, Bo Hu, Luis Barraza-Araiza, Amritpal Rehill

See also: Dementia care costs to nearly treble in next two decades | London School of Economics and Political Science

Dementia: comorbidities in patients

Analysis of primary care data relating to other health conditions that patients with dementia live with in England | Public Health England

NHS England has published a data briefing on the analysis of a sample of primary care records of patients with dementia, relating to their other health conditions (comorbidities).

It examines whether:

  • patients with dementia are more likely to have comorbidities
  • patients with dementia are more likely to have multiple comorbidities
  • different subtypes of dementias lead to different patterns of comorbidities

The comorbidities considered in this study are conditions that:

  • can increase the risk of dementia such as hypertension, coronary heart disease (CHD) and diabetes
  • are associated with dementia such as stroke or transient ischaemic attack (stroke or TIA), depression, Parkinsonism, epilepsy, severe mental illness or psychosis (SMI)
  • are physical conditions not directly associated with dementia – such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

The briefing asks commissioners and health and care providers to consider the plans they have in place to diagnose and treat the other conditions that people living with dementia experience, particularly those living with more severe dementias.

They should also consider how multiple morbidities can be successfully managed in a comprehensive personal care plan, as outlined in the NHS Long Term Plan, to improve health outcomes and provide better support – with an active focus on supporting people in the community.

Full detail: Dementia: comorbidities in patients – data briefing