Nursing home builds real-life 1950s memory lane to help dementia patients

The Telegraph | October 2018 | Nursing home builds real-life 1950s memory lane to help dementia patients

Starting this week (3 October) residents at the Five Rise Nursing Home in Bingley can take a stroll down an artificial street designed to resemble how the West Yorkshire town looked in the 1950s.

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The new-build home which cost £6m, is an innovation from twin brothers Danny and Damien Holt.

Damien, a psychiatric nurse, said: “People with advanced dementia can have very complex needs and we know how vital it is to provide plenty of mental stimulation in a safe, modern environment.

“Many of our residents have lived around Bingley for years.

“They remember it as it was.

“The purpose of our memory lane is to provide an attractive and interesting destination for the people we care for, offering reminiscence therapy to improve the psychological well being and quality of life for our residents.”( Source: The Telegraph)

 

News story from The Telegraph 

Extra Care Housing – a Focus on Dementia

Housing LIN | September 2018 | Viewpoint 91

The Housing Learning and Improvement Network (Housing LIN) have added a new viewpoint to their resource library which discusses when extra care housing is an appropriate choice for someone with dementia, and what factors might trigger someone living with dementia in extra care housing to move out.

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Download the viewpoint from Housing LIN here 

 

Dementia (update): Topic engagement [NICE]

NICE | September 2018 | Dementia (update)

NICE want to hear about the 5 key areas for quality improvement which you consider as having the greatest potential to improve the quality of care in this area. Tell NICE about the 5 key areas for quality improvement which you consider as having the greatest potential to improve the quality of care in this area (NICE).

See NICE for details

World Alzheimer’s Day

Today, 21 September 2018, is World Alzheimer’s Day. Coinciding with this, Alzheimer’s Disease International have released  the World Alzheimer Report 2018: The State of the art of dementia research: New frontiers. 

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Image source: http://www.alz.co.uk/

This report is written to be of appeal to a broad audience including governments and policymakers, academics and researchers and the general public with an interest in dementia.

Essentially the report is an overview of where we are currently: the hopes and frustrations, the barriers, the enablers and the ground-breaking work being undertaken.

 

The report’s key calls-to-action:

  • Improving the sharing, using and disseminating of data and using registries in the best possible way.
  • A minimum 1% of the societal cost of dementia to be devoted to funding research in: basic science, care improvements, prevention and risk reduction, drug development and public health.
  • Attracting researchers and skill to the sector
  • Increasing the scale of new research with the global ratio of publications on neurodegenerative disorders versus cancer at just 1:12
  • Involvement of people in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) in the research process.
  • Encouraging innovation, the use of technology and entrepreneurship.

Full report: World Alzheimer Report 2018

To support the 2018 World Alzheimer’s Month campaign, Alzheimer’s Disease International (ADI) in partnership with ITN Productions have released the documentary film below  ‘Every 3 seconds’ to help raise awareness of global impact of dementia:

 

Stroke and dementia risk: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Kuźma, Elżbieta et al.| 2018| Stroke and dementia risk: A systematic review and meta-analysis| Alzheimer’s & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer’s Association , Vol. 0 , Issue 0 | https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jalz.2018.06.3061

A new systematic review and meta- analysis is the first to conduct a meta-analysis of the relationship between stroke and all-cause dementia risk. This systematic review and meta-analysis provides evidence that stroke is a strong independent risk factor for dementia. The review is published in Alzheimer & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer’s Association.

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Abstract

Introduction

Stroke is an established risk factor for all-cause dementia, though meta-analyses are needed to quantify this risk.

Methods

We searched Medline, PsycINFO, and Embase for studies assessing prevalent or incident stroke versus a no-stroke comparison group and the risk of all-cause dementia. Random effects meta-analysis was used to pool adjusted estimates across studies, and meta-regression was used to investigate potential effect modifiers.

Results

We identified 36 studies of prevalent stroke (1.9 million participants) and 12 studies of incident stroke (1.3 million participants). For prevalent stroke, the pooled hazard ratio for all-cause dementia was 1.69. Study characteristics did not modify these associations, with the exception of sex which explained 50.2% of between-study heterogeneity for prevalent stroke.

Discussion

Stroke is a strong, independent, and potentially modifiable risk factor for all-cause dementia.

Read the full article at the Alzheimer’s & Dementia

 

New person-centred service being developed by Alzheimer’s Society

Alzheimer’s Society | September 2018 | Keeping connected: The right support at the right time

Dementia Connect, is a new service being developed  by the Alzheimer’s Society to keep in touch with and support people affected by dementia. The service, currently available in Penine Lancashire- where it is being piloted- involves specialist dementia advisers assessing and addressing the needs of people who either contact the service themselves or who are referred to Dementia Connect.

 

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The new service provides a combination of  face-to-face support with telephone and online advice, so people can access the help that they need, when they need it. It is part of The Alzheimer’s Society  strategy New Deal on Dementia,  which aims by 2022,  for everyone affected by the condition to be offered information, advice and support (Source: Alzheimer’s Society).

Full details and to read about the impact of the service on  people affected by dementia visit Alzheimer’s Society 

Are noise and air pollution related to the incidence of dementia? A cohort study in London

Carey IMAnderson HRAtkinson RW, et al| 2018 | Are noise and air pollution related to the incidence of dementia? A cohort study in London, England |

A new article published  in the BMJ Open investigated an association between dementia and air and noise pollution in London. The cohort study included 75  Greater London Practices and involved patients with no recorded history of dementia. 

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Abstract

Objective To investigate whether the incidence of dementia is related to residential levels of air and noise pollution in London.

Design Retrospective cohort study using primary care data.

Setting 75 Greater London practices.

Participants 130 978 adults aged 50–79 years registered with their general practices on 1 January 2005, with no recorded history of dementia or care home residence.

Primary and secondary outcome measures A first recorded diagnosis of dementia and, where specified, subgroups of Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia during 2005–2013. The average annual concentrations during 2004 of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), particulate matter with a median aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to2.5 µm (PM2.5) and ozone (O3) were estimated at 20×20 m resolution from dispersion models. Traffic intensity, distance from major road and night-time noise levels (Lnight) were estimated at the postcode level. All exposure measures were linked anonymously to clinical data via residential postcode. HRs from Cox models were adjusted for age, sex, ethnicity, smoking and body mass index, with further adjustments explored for area deprivation and comorbidity.

Results 2181 subjects (1.7%) received an incident diagnosis of dementia (39% mentioning Alzheimer’s disease, 29% vascular dementia). There was a positive exposure response relationship between dementia and all measures of air pollution except O3, which was not readily explained by further adjustment. Adults living in areas with the highest fifth of NO2 concentration  versus the lowest fifth  were at a higher risk of dementia. Increases in dementia risk were also observed with PM2.5, PM2.5 specifically from primary traffic sources only and Lnight, but only NO2 and PM2.5 remained statistically significant in multipollutant models. Associations were more consistent for Alzheimer’s disease than vascular dementia.

Conclusions We have found evidence of a positive association between residential levels of air pollution across London and being diagnosed with dementia, which is unexplained by known confounding factors.

Read the full article at BMJ Open 

Related:

OnMedica Air pollution may be linked to heightened dementia risk