One in two women and one in three men will develop neurological disease

OnMedica | October 2018 | One in two women and one in three men will develop neurological disease

A research team from the Netherlands studied  lifetime risk of dementia, stroke and parkinsonism, in over 12,102 individuals (just over half of them women) who at baseline were aged at least 45 years (median 62.2 years), and free from these diseases, for 26 years,  between the years 1990 and 2016 in a  prospective population- based study.

Within this period over 1400 individuals were diagnosed with dementia, 1,285 with stroke and more than 250 with parkinsonism; and of these 438 people (14.6%) were diagnosed with multiple diseases. The researchers found that women were almost twice as likely as men to be diagnosed with both stroke and dementia during their lifetime. Females over 45 years of age had a significantly higher lifetime risk of developing dementia and stroke than men (31.4% compared with 18.6% in men; and 21.6% compared with 19.3% in men, respectively); whereas lifetime risk of parkinsonism (4.3% in women and 4.9% in men) was not significantly different. They also saw similar patterns in sex-specific occurrence for Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia, ischaemic, haemorrhagic and unspecified stroke and Parkinson’s disease (Source: OnMedica)

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Read the full news story from OnMedica One in two women and one in three men will develop neurological disease

Abstract

Objective To quantify the burden of common neurological disease in older adults in terms of lifetime risks, including their co-occurrence and preventive potential, within a competing risk framework.

Methods Within the prospective population-based Rotterdam Study, we studied lifetime risk of dementia, stroke and parkinsonism between 1990 and 2016. Among 12 102 individuals (57.7% women) aged more than or equal to 45 years free from these diseases at baseline, we studied co-occurrence, and quantified the combined, and disease-specific remaining lifetime risk of these diseases at various ages for men and women separately. We also projected effects on lifetime risk of hypothetical preventive strategies that delay disease onset by 1, 2 and 3 years, respectively.

Results During follow-up of up to 26 years (156 088 person-years of follow-up), 1489 individuals were diagnosed with dementia, 1285 with stroke and 263 with parkinsonism. Of these individuals, 438 (14.6%) were diagnosed with multiple diseases. Women were almost twice as likely as men to be diagnosed with both stroke and dementia during their lifetime. The lifetime risk for any of these diseases at age 45 was 48.2%  in women and 36.2% in men. This difference was driven by a higher risk of dementia as the first manifesting disease in women than in men, while this was similar for stroke  and parkinsonism. Preventive strategies that delay disease onset with 1 to 3 years could theoretically reduce lifetime risk for developing any of these diseases by 20%–50%.

Conclusion One in two women and one in three men will develop dementia, stroke or parkinsonism during their life. These findings strengthen the call for prioritising the focus on preventive interventions at population level which could substantially reduce the burden of common neurological diseases in the ageing population.

The full article is available to read at BMJ Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry 

Full reference: Licher SDarweesh SKLWolters FJ, et al. | 2018| 
Lifetime risk of common neurological diseases in the elderly population
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